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The CAN-SPAM Act of 2003

A Bit Of History About CAN-SPAM

The CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 was signed into law on December 16, 2003 by President George W. Bush.  This law was the United State's first attempt at a national regulation for the sending of commercial email.  The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is responsible for regulating and enforcing the law. 

CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 is an acronym which stands for: Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act of 2003.  Many anti-spammers have taken a stance against this law claiming that it is a failed attempt at really regulating spam within the United States and is too weak to really halt the sending of spam.  Many even call it the You-Can-Spam Act because the law does not require emailers to obtain permission from those they email before sending email marketing messages.  The law also prohibits individual states who wish to pass stronger anti-spam laws from doing so.  In addition, individuals who receive spam mail are not allowed to sue the sender of the spam.  While companies that send these emails are required to provide a return address in their emails, only legitimate and legal companies abide by this rule.  Most senders of spam are illegitimate companies who are operating outside of the United States.  Therefore, there is no means to enforce this requirement of the law.


Enacted legislation:

 

Proposed legislation:

 

State legislation

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Identity theft comes in many forms.

A person\92s identity can be 'borrowed' for the purpose of creating fictional credit cards or a person\92s entire identity can be usurped to the point where they can have difficulty proving that they really are who they claim to be.

Up to 18% of identity theft victims take as long as four years to realize that their identity has been stolen.

There are many ways to protect your personal identity and many steps you can take to prevent your identity from being stolen:

*Never give out unnecessary personal information
*Never provide bank details or social security numbers over the Internet
*Always remain aware of who is standing behind you when you type in your personal credit codes at ATM machines and at supermarket checkout swipe machines.