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The text of S. 877 as it was introduced on April 10, 2003, appears below.

The final version of the legislation is available here.



108th CONGRESS

1st Session

S. 877

To regulate interstate commerce by imposing limitations and penalties on the transmission of unsolicited commercial electronic mail via the Internet.

IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

April 10, 2003

Mr. BURNS (for himself, Mr. WYDEN, Mr. STEVENS, Mr. BREAUX, Mr. THOMAS, Ms. LANDRIEU, and Mr. SCHUMER) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation


A BILL

To regulate interstate commerce by imposing limitations and penalties on the transmission of unsolicited commercial electronic mail via the Internet.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the 'Controlling the Assault of Non-Solicited Pornography and Marketing Act of 2003', or the 'CAN-SPAM Act of 2003'.

SEC. 2. CONGRESSIONAL FINDINGS AND POLICY.

    (a) FINDINGS- The Congress finds the following:

      (1) There is a right of free speech on the Internet.

      (2) The Internet has increasingly become a critical mode of global communication and now presents unprecedented opportunities for the development and growth of global commerce and an integrated worldwide economy.

      (3) In order for global commerce on the Internet to reach its full potential, individuals and entities using the Internet and other online services should be prevented from engaging in activities that prevent other users and Internet service providers from having a reasonably predictable, efficient, and economical online experience.

      (4) Unsolicited commercial electronic mail can be a mechanism through which businesses advertise and attract customers in the online environment.

      (5) The receipt of unsolicited commercial electronic mail may result in costs to recipients who cannot refuse to accept such mail and who incur costs for the storage of such mail, or for the time spent accessing, reviewing, and discarding such mail, or for both.

      (6) Unsolicited commercial electronic mail may impose significant monetary costs on providers of Internet access services, businesses, and educational and nonprofit institutions that carry and receive such mail, as there is a finite volume of mail that such providers, businesses, and institutions can handle without further investment in infrastructure.

      (7) Some unsolicited commercial electronic mail contains material that many recipients may consider vulgar or pornographic in nature.

      (8) While some senders of unsolicited commercial electronic mail messages provide simple and reliable ways for recipients to reject (or 'opt-out' of) receipt of unsolicited commercial electronic mail from such senders in the future, other senders provide no such 'opt-out' mechanism, or refuse to honor the requests of recipients not to receive electronic mail from such senders in the future, or both.

      (9) An increasing number of senders of unsolicited commercial electronic mail purposefully disguise the source of such mail so as to prevent recipients from responding to such mail quickly and easily.

      (10) An increasing number of senders of unsolicited commercial electronic mail purposefully include misleading information in the message's subject lines in order to induce the recipients to view the messages.

      (11) In legislating against certain abuses on the Internet, Congress should be very careful to avoid infringing in any way upon constitutionally protected rights, including the rights of assembly, free speech, and privacy.

    (b) CONGRESSIONAL DETERMINATION OF PUBLIC POLICY- On the basis of the findings in subsection (a), the Congress determines that--

      (1) there is a substantial government interest in regulation of unsolicited commercial electronic mail;

      (2) senders of unsolicited commercial electronic mail should not mislead recipients as to the source or content of such mail; and

      (3) recipients of unsolicited commercial electronic mail have a right to decline to receive additional unsolicited commercial electronic mail from the same source.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

    In this Act:

      (1) AFFIRMATIVE CONSENT- The term 'affirmative consent', when used with respect to a commercial electronic mail message, means that the recipient has expressly consented to receive the message, either in response to a clear and conspicuous request for such consent or at the recipient's own initiative.

      (2) Commercial electronic mail message-

        (A) IN GENERAL- The term 'commercial electronic mail message' means any electronic mail message the primary purpose of which is the commercial advertisement or promotion of a commercial product or service (including content on an Internet website operated for a commercial purpose).

        (B) REFERENCE TO COMPANY OR WEBSITE- The inclusion of a reference to a commercial entity or a link to the website of a commercial entity in an electronic mail message does not, by itself, cause such message to be treated as a commercial electronic mail message for purposes of this Act if the contents or circumstances of the message indicate a primary purpose other than commercial advertisement or promotion of a commercial product or service.

      (3) COMMISSION- The term 'Commission' means the Federal Trade Commission.

      (4) DOMAIN NAME- The term 'domain name' means any alphanumeric designation which is registered with or assigned by any domain name registrar, domain name registry, or other domain name registration authority as part of an electronic address on the Internet.

      (5) ELECTRONIC MAIL ADDRESS- The term 'electronic mail address' means a destination, commonly expressed as a string of characters, consisting of a unique user name or mailbox (commonly referred to as the 'local part') and a reference to an Internet domain (commonly referred to as the 'domain part'), to which an electronic mail message can be sent or delivered.

      (6) ELECTRONIC MAIL MESSAGE- The term 'electronic mail message' means a message sent to an electronic mail address.

      (7) FTC ACT- The term 'FTC Act' means the Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C. 41 et seq.).

      (8) HEADER INFORMATION- The term 'header information' means the source, destination, and routing information attached to an electronic mail message, including the originating domain name and originating electronic mail address.

      (9) IMPLIED CONSENT- The term 'implied consent', when used with respect to a commercial electronic mail message, means that--

        (A) within the 3-year period ending upon receipt of such message, there has been a business transaction between the sender and the recipient (including a transaction involving the provision, free of charge, of information, goods, or services requested by the recipient); and

        (B) the recipient was, at the time of such transaction or thereafter in the first electronic mail message received from the sender after the effective date of this Act, provided a clear and conspicuous notice of an opportunity not to receive unsolicited commercial electronic mail messages from the sender and has not exercised such opportunity.

      If a sender operates through separate lines of business or divisions and holds itself out to the recipient, both at the time of the transaction described in subparagraph (A) and at the time the notice under subparagraph (B) was provided to the recipient, as that particular line of business or division rather than as the entity of which such line of business or division is a part, then the line of business or the division shall be treated as the sender for purposes of this paragraph.

      (10) INITIATE- The term 'initiate', when used with respect to a commercial electronic mail message, means to originate such message or to procure the origination of such message, but shall not include actions that constitute routine conveyance of such message.

      (11) INTERNET- The term 'Internet' has the meaning given that term in the Internet Tax Freedom Act (47 U.S.C. 151 nt).

      (12) INTERNET ACCESS SERVICE- The term 'Internet access service' has the meaning given that term in section 231(e)(4) of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 231(e)(4)).

      (13) PROTECTED COMPUTER- The term 'protected computer' has the meaning given that term in section 1030(e)(2) of title 18, United States Code.

      (14) RECIPIENT- The term 'recipient', when used with respect to a commercial electronic mail message, means an authorized user of the electronic mail address to which the message was sent or delivered. If a recipient of a commercial electronic mail message has 1 or more electronic mail addresses in addition to the address to which the message was sent or delivered, the recipient shall be treated as a separate recipient with respect to each such address. If an electronic mail address is reassigned to a new user, the new user shall not be treated as a recipient of any commercial electronic mail message sent or delivered to that address before it was reassigned.

      (15) ROUTINE CONVEYANCE- The term 'routine conveyance' means the transmission, routing, relaying, handling, or storing, through an automatic technical process, of an electronic mail message for which another person has provided and selected the recipient addresses.

      (16) SENDER- The term 'sender', when used with respect to a commercial electronic mail message, means a person who initiates such a message and whose product, service, or Internet web site is advertised or promoted by the message.

      (17) TRANSACTIONAL OR RELATIONSHIP MESSAGES- The term 'transactional or relationship message' means an electronic mail message the primary purpose of which is to facilitate, complete, confirm, provide, or request information concerning--

        (A) a commercial transaction that the recipient has previously agreed to enter into with the sender;

        (B) an existing commercial relationship, formed with or without an exchange of consideration, involving the ongoing purchase or use by the recipient of products or services offered by the sender; or

        (C) an existing employment relationship or related benefit plan.

      (18) UNSOLICITED COMMERCIAL ELECTRONIC MAIL MESSAGE- The term 'unsolicited commercial electronic mail message' means any commercial electronic mail message that--

        (A) is not a transactional or relationship message; and

        (B) is sent to a recipient without the recipient's prior affirmative or implied consent.

SEC. 4. CRIMINAL PENALTY FOR UNSOLICITED COMMERCIAL ELECTRONIC MAIL CONTAINING FRAUDULENT ROUTING INFORMATION.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Chapter 63 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

' 1351. Unsolicited commercial electronic mail containing fraudulent transmission information

    '(a) IN GENERAL- Any person who initiates the transmission, to a protected computer in the United States, of an unsolicited commercial electronic mail message, with knowledge and intent that the message contains or is accompanied by header information that is materially false or materially misleading shall be fined or imprisoned for not more than 1 year, or both, under this title. For purposes of this subsection, header information that is technically accurate but includes an originating electronic mail address the access to which for purposes of initiating the message was obtained by means of false or fraudulent pretenses or representations shall be considered materially misleading.

    '(b) DEFINITIONS- Any term used in subsection (a) that is defined in section 3 of the CAN-SPAM Act of 2003 has the meaning given it in that section.'.

    (b) CONFORMING AMENDMENT- The chapter analysis for chapter 63 of title 18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

      '1351. Unsolicited commercial electronic mail containing fraudulent routing information'.

SEC. 5. OTHER PROTECTIONS AGAINST UNSOLICITED COMMERCIAL ELECTRONIC MAIL.

    (a) REQUIREMENTS FOR TRANSMISSION OF MESSAGES-

      (1) PROHIBITION OF FALSE OR MISLEADING TRANSMISSION INFORMATION- It is unlawful for any person to initiate the transmission, to a protected computer, of a commercial electronic mail message that contains, or is accompanied by, header information that is materially or intentionally false or materially or intentionally misleading. For purposes of this paragraph, header information that is technically accurate but includes an originating electronic mail address the access to which for purposes of initiating the message was obtained by means of false or fraudulent pretenses or representations shall be considered materially misleading.

      (2) PROHIBITION OF DECEPTIVE SUBJECT HEADINGS- It is unlawful for any person to initiate the transmission to a protected computer of a commercial electronic mail message with a subject heading that such person knows would be likely to mislead a recipient, acting reasonably under the circumstances, about a material fact regarding the contents or subject matter of the message.

      (3) Inclusion of return address or comparable mechanism in unsolicited commercial electronic mail-

        (A) IN GENERAL- It is unlawful for any person to initiate the transmission to a protected computer of an unsolicited commercial electronic mail message that does not contain a functioning return electronic mail address or other Internet-based mechanism, clearly and conspicuously displayed, that--

          (i) a recipient may use to submit, in a manner specified by the sender, a reply electronic mail message or other form of Internet-based communication requesting not to receive any future unsolicited commercial electronic mail messages from that sender at the electronic mail address where the message was received; and

          (ii) remains capable of receiving such messages or communications for no less than 30 days after the transmission of the original message.

        (B) MORE DETAILED OPTIONS POSSIBLE- The sender of an unsolicited commercial electronic mail message may comply with subparagraph (A)(i) by providing the recipient a list or menu from which the recipient may choose the specific types of commercial electronic mail messages the recipient wants to receive or does not want to receive from the sender, if the list or menu includes an option under which the recipient may choose not to receive any unsolicited commercial electronic mail messages from the sender.

        (C) TEMPORARY INABILITY TO RECEIVE MESSAGES OR PROCESS REQUESTS- A return electronic mail address or other mechanism does not fail to satisfy the requirements of subparagraph (A) if it is unexpectedly and temporarily unable to receive messages or process requests due to technical or capacity problems, if the problem with receiving messages or processing requests is corrected within a reasonable time period.

      (4) PROHIBITION OF TRANSMISSION OF UNSOLICITED COMMERCIAL ELECTRONIC MAIL AFTER OBJECTION- If a recipient makes a request to a sender, using a mechanism provided pursuant to paragraph (3), not to receive some or any unsolicited commercial electronic mail messages from such sender, then it is unlawful--

        (A) for the sender to initiate the transmission to the recipient, more than 10 business days after the receipt of such request, of an unsolicited commercial electronic mail message that falls within the scope of the request;

        (B) for any person acting on behalf of the sender to initiate the transmission to the recipient, more than 10 business days after the receipt of such request, of an unsolicited commercial electronic mail message that such person knows or consciously avoids knowing falls within the scope of the request; or

        (C) for any person acting on behalf of the sender to assist in initiating the transmission to the recipient, through the provision or selection of addresses to which the message will be sent, of an unsolicited commercial electronic mail message that the person knows, or consciously avoids knowing, would violate subparagraph (A) or (B).

      (5) INCLUSION OF IDENTIFIER, OPT-OUT, AND PHYSICAL ADDRESS IN UNSOLICITED COMMERCIAL ELECTRONIC MAIL- It is unlawful for any person to initiate the transmission of any unsolicited commercial electronic mail message to a protected computer unless the message provides--

        (A) clear and conspicuous identification that the message is an advertisement or solicitation;

        (B) clear and conspicuous notice of the opportunity under paragraph (3) to decline to receive further unsolicited commercial electronic mail messages from the sender; and

        (C) a valid physical postal address of the sender.

    (b) Prohibition of Transmission of Unlawful Unsolicited Commercial Electronic Mail to Certain Harvested Electronic Mail Addresses-

      (1) IN GENERAL- It is unlawful for any person to initiate the transmission, to a protected computer, of an unsolicited commercial electronic mail message that is unlawful under subsection (a), or to assist in the origination of such a message through the provision or selection of addresses to which the message will be sent, if such person knows that, or acts with reckless disregard as to whether--

        (A) the electronic mail address of the recipient was obtained, using an automated means, from an Internet website or proprietary online service operated by another person; or

        (B) the website or proprietary online service from which the address was obtained included, at the time the address was obtained, a notice stating that the operator of such a website or proprietary online service will not give, sell, or otherwise transfer addresses maintained by such site or service to any other party for the purpose of initiating, or enabling others to initiate, unsolicited electronic mail messages.

      (2) DISCLAIMER- Nothing in this subsection creates an ownership or proprietary interest in such electronic mail addresses.

    (c) COMPLIANCE PROCEDURES- An action for violation of paragraph (2), (3), (4), or (5) of subsection (a) may not proceed if the person against whom the action is brought demonstrates that--

      (1) the person has established and implemented, with due care, reasonable practices and procedures to effectively prevent violations of such paragraph; and

      (2) the violation occurred despite good faith efforts to maintain compliance with such practices and procedures.

SEC. 6. ENFORCEMENT BY FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION.

    (a) VIOLATION IS UNFAIR OR DECEPTIVE ACT OR PRACTICE- Except as provided in subsection (b), this Act shall be enforced by the Commission as if the violation of this Act were an unfair or deceptive act or practice proscribed under section 18(a)(1)(B) of the Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C. 57a(a)(1)(B)).

    (b) ENFORCEMENT BY CERTAIN OTHER AGENCIES- Compliance with this Act shall be enforced--

      (1) under section 8 of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. 1818), in the case of--

        (A) national banks, and Federal branches and Federal agencies of foreign banks, and any subsidiaries of such entities (except brokers, dealers, persons providing insurance, investment companies, and investment advisers), by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency;

        (B) member banks of the Federal Reserve System (other than national banks), branches and agencies of foreign banks (other than Federal branches, Federal agencies, and insured State branches of foreign banks), commercial lending companies owned or controlled by foreign banks, organizations operating under section 25 or 25A of the Federal Reserve Act (12 U.S.C. 601 and 611), and bank holding companies and their nonbank subsidiaries or affiliates (except brokers, dealers, persons providing insurance, investment companies, and investment advisers), by the Board;

        (C) banks insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (other than members of the Federal Reserve System) insured State branches of foreign banks, and any subsidiaries of such entities (except brokers, dealers, persons providing insurance, investment companies, and investment advisers), by the Board of Directors of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation; and

        (D) savings associations the deposits of which are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, and any subsidiaries of such savings associations (except brokers, dealers, persons providing insurance, investment companies, and investment advisers), by the Director of the Office of Thrift Supervision;

      (2) under the Federal Credit Union Act (12 U.S.C. 1751 et seq.) by the Board of the National Credit Union Administration with respect to any Federally insured credit union, and any subsidiaries of such a credit union;

      (3) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78a et seq.) by the Securities and Exchange Commission with respect to any broker or dealer;

      (4) under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80a-1 et seq.) by the Securities and Exchange Commission with respect to investment companies;

      (5) under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S.C. 80b-1 et seq.) by the Securities and Exchange Commission with respect to investment advisers registered under that Act;

      (6) under State insurance law in the case of any person engaged in providing insurance, by the applicable State insurance authority of the State in which the person is domiciled, subject to section 104 of the Gramm-Bliley-Leach Act (15 U.S.C. 6701);

      (7) under part A of subtitle VII of title 49, United States Code, by the Secretary of Transportation with respect to any air carrier or foreign air carrier subject to that part;

      (8) under the Packers and Stockyards Act, 1921 (7 U.S.C. 181 et seq.) (except as provided in section 406 of that Act (7 U.S.C. 226, 227)), by the Secretary of Agriculture with respect to any activities subject to that Act;

      (9) under the Farm Credit Act of 1971 (12 U.S.C. 2001 et seq.) by the Farm Credit Administration with respect to any Federal land bank, Federal land bank association, Federal intermediate credit bank, or production credit association; and

      (10) under the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 151 et seq.) by the Federal Communications Commission with respect to any person subject to the provisions of that Act.

    (c) EXERCISE OF CERTAIN POWERS- For the purpose of the exercise by any agency referred to in subsection (b) of its powers under any Act referred to in that subsection, a violation of this Act is deemed to be a violation of a requirement imposed under that Act. In addition to its powers under any provision of law specifically referred to in subsection (b), each of the agencies referred to in that subsection may exercise, for the purpose of enforcing compliance with any requirement imposed under this Act, any other authority conferred on it by law.

    (d) ACTIONS BY THE COMMISSION- The Commission shall prevent any person from violating this Act in the same manner, by the same means, and with the same jurisdiction, powers, and duties as though all applicable terms and provisions of the Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C. 41 et seq.) were incorporated into and made a part of this Act. Any entity that violates any provision of that subtitle is subject to the penalties and entitled to the privileges and immunities provided in the Federal Trade Commission Act in the same manner, by the same means, and with the same jurisdiction, power, and duties as though all applicable terms and provisions of the Federal Trade Commission Act were incorporated into and made a part of that subtitle.

    (e) Enforcement by States-

      (1) CIVIL ACTION- In any case in which the attorney general of a State has reason to believe that an interest of the residents of that State has been or is threatened or adversely affected by any person engaging in a practice that violates section 5 of this Act, the State, as parens patriae, may bring a civil action on behalf of the residents of the State in a district court of the United States of appropriate jurisdiction or in any other court of competent jurisdiction--

        (A) to enjoin further violation of section 5 of this Act by the defendant; or

        (B) to obtain damages on behalf of residents of the State, in an amount equal to the greater of--

          (i) the actual monetary loss suffered by such residents; or

          (ii) the amount determined under paragraph (2).

      (2) STATUTORY DAMAGES-

        (A) IN GENERAL- For purposes of paragraph (1)(B)(ii), the amount determined under this paragraph is the amount calculated by multiplying the number of willful, knowing, or negligent violations by an amount, in the discretion of the court, of up to $10 (with each separately addressed unlawful message received by such residents treated as a separate violation). In determining the per-violation penalty under this subparagraph, the court shall take into account the degree of culpability, any history of prior such conduct, ability to pay, the extent of economic gain resulting from the violation, and such other matters as justice may require.

        (B) LIMITATION- For any violation of section 5 (other than section 5(a)(1)), the amount determined under subparagraph (A) may not exceed $500,000, except that if the court finds that the defendant committed the violation willfully and knowingly, the court may increase the limitation established by this paragraph from $500,000 to an amount not to exceed $1,500,000.

      (3) ATTORNEY FEES- In the case of any successful action under paragraph (1), the State shall be awarded the costs of the action and reasonable attorney fees as determined by the court.

      (4) RIGHTS OF FEDERAL REGULATORS- The State shall serve prior written notice of any action under paragraph (1) upon the Federal Trade Commission or the appropriate Federal regulator determined under subsection (b) and provide the Commission or appropriate Federal regulator with a copy of its complaint, except in any case in which such prior notice is not feasible, in which case the State shall serve such notice immediately upon instituting such action. The Federal Trade Commission or appropriate Federal regulator shall have the right--

        (A) to intervene in the action;

        (B) upon so intervening, to be heard on all matters arising therein;

        (C) to remove the action to the appropriate United States district court; and

        (D) to file petitions for appeal.

      (5) CONSTRUCTION- For purposes of bringing any civil action under paragraph (1), nothing in this Act shall be construed to prevent an attorney general of a State from exercising the powers conferred on the attorney general by the laws of that State to--

        (A) conduct investigations;

        (B) administer oaths or affirmations; or

        (C) compel the attendance of witnesses or the production of documentary and other evidence.

      (6) VENUE; SERVICE OF PROCESS-

        (A) VENUE- Any action brought under paragraph (1) may be brought in the district court of the United States that meets applicable requirements relating to venue under section 1391 of title 28, United States Code.

        (B) SERVICE OF PROCESS- In an action brought under paragraph (1), process may be served in any district in which the defendant--

          (i) is an inhabitant; or

          (ii) maintains a physical place of business.

      (7) LIMITATION ON STATE ACTION WHILE FEDERAL ACTION IS PENDING- If the Commission or other appropriate Federal agency under subsection (b) has instituted a civil action or an administrative action for violation of this Act, no State attorney general may bring an action under this subsection during the pendency of that action against any defendant named in the complaint of the Commission or the other agency for any violation of this Act alleged in the complaint.

    (f) Action by Provider of Internet Access Service-

      (1) ACTION AUTHORIZED- A provider of Internet access service adversely affected by a violation of section 5 may bring a civil action in any district court of the United States with jurisdiction over the defendant, or in any other court of competent jurisdiction, to--

        (A) enjoin further violation by the defendant; or

        (B) recover damages in an amount equal to the greater of--

          (i) actual monetary loss incurred by the provider of Internet access service as a result of such violation; or

          (ii) the amount determined under paragraph (2).

      (2) STATUTORY DAMAGES-

        (A) IN GENERAL- For purposes of paragraph (1)(B)(ii), the amount determined under this paragraph is the amount calculated by multiplying the number of willful, knowing, or negligent violations by an amount, in the discretion of the court, of up to $10 (with each separately addressed unlawful message carried over the facilities of the provider of Internet access service or sent to an electronic mail address obtained from the provider of Internet access service in violation of section 5(b) treated as a separate violation). In determining the per-violation penalty under this subparagraph, the court shall take into account the degree of culpability, any history of prior such conduct, ability to pay, the extent of economic gain resulting from the violation, and such other matters as justice may require.

        (B) LIMITATION- For any violation of section 5 (other than section 5(a)(1)), the amount determined under subparagraph (A) may not exceed $500,000, except that if the court finds that the defendant committed the violation willfully and knowingly, the court may increase the limitation established by this paragraph from $500,000 to an amount not to exceed $1,500,000.

      (3) ATTORNEY FEES- In any action brought pursuant to paragraph (1), the court may, in its discretion, require an undertaking for the payment of the costs of such action, and assess reasonable costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, against any party.

SEC. 7. EFFECT ON OTHER LAWS.

    (a) FEDERAL LAW-

      (1) Nothing in this Act shall be construed to impair the enforcement of section 223 or 231 of the Communications Act of 1934 (47 U.S.C. 223 or 231, respectively), chapter 71 (relating to obscenity) or 110 (relating to sexual exploitation of children) of title 18, United States Code, or any other Federal criminal statute.

      (2) Nothing in this Act shall be construed to affect in any way the Commission's authority to bring enforcement actions under FTC Act for materially false or deceptive representations in commercial electronic mail messages.

    (b) STATE LAW-

      (1) IN GENERAL- This Act supersedes any State or local government statute, regulation, or rule regulating the use of electronic mail to send commercial messages.

      (2) EXCEPTIONS- Except as provided in paragraph (3), this Act does not supersede or pre-empt--

        (A) State trespass, contract, or tort law or any civil action thereunder; or

        (B) any provision of Federal, State, or local criminal law or any civil remedy available under such law that relates to acts of fraud or theft perpetrated by means of the unauthorized transmission of commercial electronic mail messages.

      (3) LIMITATION ON EXCEPTIONS- Paragraph (2) does not apply to a State or local government statute, regulation, or rule that directly regulates unsolicited commercial electronic mail and that treats the mere sending of unsolicited commercial electronic mail in a manner that complies with this Act as sufficient to constitute a violation of such statute, regulation, or rule or to create a cause of action thereunder.

    (c) NO EFFECT ON POLICIES OF PROVIDERS OF INTERNET ACCESS SERVICE- Nothing in this Act shall be construed to have any effect on the lawfulness or unlawfulness, under any other provision of law, of the adoption, implementation, or enforcement by a provider of Internet access service of a policy of declining to transmit, route, relay, handle, or store certain types of electronic mail messages.

SEC. 8. STUDY OF EFFECTS OF UNSOLICITED COMMERCIAL ELECTRONIC MAIL.

    (a) IN GENERAL- Not later than 24 months after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Commission, in consultation with the Department of Justice and other appropriate agencies, shall submit a report to the Congress that provides a detailed analysis of the effectiveness and enforcement of the provisions of this Act and the need (if any) for the Congress to modify such provisions.

    (b) REQUIRED ANALYSIS- The Commission shall include in the report required by subsection (a) an analysis of the extent to which technological and marketplace developments, including changes in the nature of the devices through which consumers access their electronic mail messages, may affect the practicality and effectiveness of the provisions of this Act.

SEC. 9. SEPARABILITY.

    If any provision of this Act or the application thereof to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of this Act and the application of such provision to other persons or circumstances shall not be affected.

SEC. 10. EFFECTIVE DATE.

    The provisions of this Act shall take effect 120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.

END

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Identity theft comes in many forms.

A person\92s identity can be 'borrowed' for the purpose of creating fictional credit cards or a person\92s entire identity can be usurped to the point where they can have difficulty proving that they really are who they claim to be.

Up to 18% of identity theft victims take as long as four years to realize that their identity has been stolen.

There are many ways to protect your personal identity and many steps you can take to prevent your identity from being stolen:

*Never give out unnecessary personal information
*Never provide bank details or social security numbers over the Internet
*Always remain aware of who is standing behind you when you type in your personal credit codes at ATM machines and at supermarket checkout swipe machines.